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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in a proxy war supported by iran and russia. the other side of the debate is nothing else is working and we need to create pressure on assad and build relationship with people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels, al-qaeda affiliated rebels the united states and the west doesn't support. and i don't think it's in the west's interest to see them end up at the top of the heap. >> rose: and then we turn to the story of the chinese army spying on the american government and american companies with david sanger of the "new york times," dune lawrence and michael riley of bloomberg businessweek. >> the cyber has been off to the side as something of an annoyance. i'm hearing this has gotten so big it's moving to the center of the relationship and it risks the rest of the relationship. i think the next thing you're going to see the president sending some kind of envoy to beijing to make that point. >> rose: the conflict in syria and spying on the united states by the chinese army when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios
the major powers, china has a key role to play here. japan, would like to see russia for a more helpful. obviously, the united nations, security council still has a role to play in many issues as it celebrates its next set of actions. but we have to, together, find a way to make sure that the kim family regime doesn't feel invulnerable when it improves its march towards a nuclearized icbm. when it improves its capabilities through provocations to the region. we need, in other words, an offense not just a defense. to put it in a different way. we have to shift from what has been defensive containment that's been very leaky because of cooperation with iran proliferation off the peninsula with the fact we have not stopped this long march to a capability, to an offensive containment strategy where the united states, especially its key allies, south korea and japan, augment in the first instance, a defensive posture, through improved and more integrated intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance through ballistic missile capability, through a readiness to deal with provocations across the
against a regime supported by iran and russia. on the other side of the debate the argument was well nothing else is working and we need to increase the pressure on assad and also build the relationship with the people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i
.t.a.r.t. treaty with russia was an example of traditional diplomacy at its best and then working it through the congress was an example of traditional bipartisan support at its best. but we also have been working with partners around the world to create a new institution, the nuclear security summit to keep dangerous materials out of the hands of terrorists. be conducted intense diplomacy with major powers to impose crippling sanctions against iran and north korea. but to enforce the sanctions, we also enlisted banks insurance companies and high-tech international financial situations. today iran's oil tankers sit idle and its currency has taken a massive hit. now this brings me to a third lever, it economics. everyone knows how important that is. but not long ago it was thought that business drove markets and governments drove geopolitics. will, those two if they ever were separate have certainly converged. so creating jobs at home is now part of the portfolio of diplomats abroad. they are arguing for common economic rules of the road especially in asia so we can make trade a race to the t
africa -- more than africa or nigeria or russia will grow, you will be willing to take more risks there because you think the growth is there. to a certain extent, where you seek political upheaval, it scares away investment. the world is so competitive, if you do not focus on markets, if not ready to win in markets, you will lose. >> how much of this can be a parochial discussion? let us a ge is a u.s. company, but let us talk about the european or asian companies that may be interested in investing on this side of the world. what will the u.s. due to distinguish itself? >> investment certainty. we need some how not to have all of the focus on sequestration, debt limits. that is distracting to investors. the systems of competitiveness. education, regulation. tax reform. those things that say we want people to invest in the u.s. our f.d.i in the country has trailed a lot of other places in the world. some of it is education training. there are systems of competitiveness. we know what they are. it is trying to get more of a window on that. it also helps -- the president of the unit
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)